• Keith Saylor

    Hello William,

    I appreciate this article as an example of the nature of the reflective process. Both the Chaplain and those who would suppress the his reflection that students consider the reflections of LBGT inclusive curriculum and decide its validity, are of the reflective nature. It is clear both sides support and promote the reflective process to guide and in form human relations. According to the article, those who support the reflective content of the curriculum reflect upon the Chaplain as engaged in "gross misconduct." In the same spirit of the reflective nature, the Chaplain reflects on his treatment as against the values or reflections of Christianity, among various other reflections.

    It is of the nature of the reflective process to nurture and promote strife and contention. The very act of promoting the reflective nature through reflective content (like external religious or secular values) to guide and inform human relations nurtures and promotes the opposite.

    There is another faculty in the conscience and consciousness of people to guide and inform their relationships and interactions. That faculty is through the presence of the inshining spirit of Jesus Christ and the spirit's immanent guidance through the agency of awareness of the ebb and flow of the spirit's motion in a given interaction or circumstance and this is outside of the reflective nature. It is the direct and unreflected awareness and experience of the relative motion itself in itself that guides.

    Here the Chaplain engages in, entertains, and promotes the same spirit of the reflective nature as those who oppose him and discovers no way to the students outside of the reflective nature and into the power and presence of the inshining presence of Jesus Christ as guide in their relationships and interactions.

    In appreciation,

    Keith