The following is a reflection from ESR student Christie Walkuski on the 2013 ESR Willson Lectures:
File:"Christ on the Cross" - NARA - 558961.tif
The paradox of our faith, and for me one of the beautiful mysteries of the unity of God, is that when we, in our own shame and hopelessness, stand in the horrifying absence of God, we enter into the very heart of God.  Rollins talks about it in a simple and beautiful way--when we open ourselves up to our own brokenness and doubt, he says, we also open ourselves up to profound love and joy.   And we can’t help being transformed in the process.
 

I like to think of this “resurrection faith” as a spirituality of showing up.  We show up to do the spiritual work of being honest about where we are emotionally and spiritually, to lean into all the broken and dirty places of doubt, anger, guilt, disappointment and suffering, and we are willing to engage, question, weep, bleed, argue, be vulnerable, and laugh anyway. 

Of course, we do not seek suffering. This is not about some kind of narcissistic martyrdom.  But we can’t escape it.  A truth of human existence is that there is suffering.  We all face profound loss and grief, from the minute we are born.  How do we want to be with that truth?   To the extent that we come to terms with the cruciform nature of life, and embrace it, is the extent that we meet God.  I am coming to understand that it is not whether I choose to love during the difficult times in life, it is that simply being willing to be in the broken places is love itself.  It is most definitely a Christ-like love.  Is this not the beautiful significance of the crucifixion?

Read more from Christie here: http://esrquaker.blogspot.com/2013/04/love-is-my-religion.html

Views: 123

Comment by Clem Gerdelmann on 4th mo. 24, 2013 at 2:25pm

And none know better of those broken places, here in the U.S.A., than Native Americans like Sioux prophetess, Vine Deloria, who writes, "Religion is for people who are afraid of going to hell. Spirituality is for those who have already been there."

Comment by Stephanie Stuckwisch on 4th mo. 26, 2013 at 11:23pm

You speak my mind, Friend.

Comment

You need to be a member of QuakerQuaker to add comments!

Join QuakerQuaker

Support Us

Did you know that QuakerQuaker is 100% reader supported? If you think this kind of outreach and conversation is important, please support it with a monthly subscription or one-time gift.


You can also make a one-time donation.

Latest Activity

Keith Saylor replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"Christ's living appearance within me has drawn me out of the reflective nature and the process…"
6th day (Fri)
Forrest Curo replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"God is also more than anyone's experience of God. It's not that we can contain God in a…"
6th day (Fri)
Keith Saylor replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"Hello Thomas, Through the immanent appearance of eternal life itself inshining upon me, I am drawn…"
6th day (Fri)
Forrest Curo replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"I'd rather encourage people to examine the Bible sympathetically than discourage them from…"
2nd month 23
William F Rushby replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"Instead of floundering and thrashing around to find a way to conceptualize God, Turn to the Bible…"
2nd month 23
Forrest Curo replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"Masculine _nouns_? A word like "Godd-ess" would imply that 'God's were normally…"
2nd month 22
Patty Quinn replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"To hear God referred to in masculine nouns and pronouns feels to me like a slap in the face to the…"
2nd month 22
Forrest Curo replied to Thomas Maxwell's discussion 'Concept of Diety'
"It's probably best to talk about many Biblical concepts of God. What they have in common is…"
2nd month 20

© 2021   Created by QuakerQuaker.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service