Glenn Morison
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  • Winnipeg, MB
  • Canada
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Glenn Morison's Discussions

Changing the time and/or day of weekly worship.

Started 2nd month 9 0 Replies

Winnipeg Monthly Meeting (which I am part of) has grown in attendance from less than 10 to closer to 30 over the past few years. A delight to be sure. But our current rented space, which we love, is…Continue

Tags: size, date, time, day, meeting

 

Glenn Morison's Page

Latest Activity

James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"I think I agree with Forest (never quite sure of that) though I also agree my use of the word true was not the best choice for even my position.  Personally I agree with Paul's position in 2Ti_3:16  "All scripture is given…"
11 hours ago
Forrest Curo commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"I don't get the meaning of "a God." If we talk about "God as-is", then we might differ as to which description applies; but at that point we'd be clear about "not just making this up." Historicity, well, I…"
yesterday
David McKay commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Fair enough. But your word "true" is a little absolute for me in this instance. The authority of the story for me is less about its historical accuracy then its witness to a God who saves us in part to gathering us into community and…"
yesterday
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Somehow we got mixed signals.  My reference to "Exodus" was to the Leon Uris book based movie intending to show how important it is to some in the Jewish race to have their independence.  So far as the Biblical story goes you…"
yesterday
David McKay commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"The two path doctrine when the options are clear works just fine. However, if as an incentive to follow the authors agenda we are given simplified choices when the situation is actually quite murky — this is less than helpful. There is little…"
yesterday
Glenn Morison posted a blog post

It takes two to tango

While there would be universal acceptance of the notion that some things require a partnership of sorts, marriage and boxing for example, these words appear in the 1952 song by the same name, which has since covered by many. The song, first made famous by Pearl Bailey, pretends to exhaust the many things one can do on one’s…See More
yesterday
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"There's a lot to be said for the two path doctrine.  Jesus says in Rev 3:15  I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. Rev 3:16  So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor…"
7th day (Sat)
David McKay commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Casablanca is a simplified model for occupied France packaged for consumption in the United States. It explores the consequences of noninvolvement in World War 2 by depicting the outcomes of various responses to the kind of universalizing violence…"
7th day (Sat)
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"The conciseness of the Bible never ceases to amaze me."
6th day (Fri)
Glenn Morison commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"James, I was trying to say my choice, interpreting the sons as irrational, was not particularly defensible other than I have heard it preached that way.  Indeed your explanation of how James and John could leave the scene so quickly is helpful.…"
6th day (Fri)
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"You did start by suggesting we put ourselves into the scene to get a better feeling for it.  My viewpoint answers your question of how James and John could just leave the family business so quickly.  I would choose Exodus over Casablanca…"
6th day (Fri)
David McKay commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"I think you may be overselling the point. I always use the film Casablanca as my model of Israel. An Arabic city conquered and re-re-conquered. You have partisans (of varying stripes), collaborators, demoralized pragmatists, idealists, and most…"
6th day (Fri)
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"In the Gospel of Luke we read that Jesus had entered the house of Simon and healed his mother-in-law the chapter before he showed Simon, James and John how to catch fish.  We can be sure that Simon had told James and John, his partners, about…"
6th day (Fri)
Glenn Morison commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Good questions James. It is a gap in the story I filled in.  And I am not sure I can give much of a better answer than it does not say he wasn't. Which is not a good answer. "
4th day (Wed)
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Why do you think Jesus was a stranger to them?"
4th day (Wed)
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'One good turn deserves another'
"Reminds me of my youth when Dad, just before he stripped a bolt, would say "just one more turn". :)"
4th day (Wed)

Profile Information

About Me
Glenn Morison is a member of Winnipeg Monthly Meeting. Glenn was worked with people on the margins of society his entire adult life. He has spent the last ten years working as a chaplain in Corrections settings.
Website/Blog
http://https://winnipegquakermeeting.edublogs.org/

What I am doing with this!

We all encounter many slogans, aphorisms, quotations and proverbs. And, working in prison chaplaincy, I have been privileged to hear great testimonies of how these words have helped people make their way through phenomenally disturbing circumstances.  For instance, I have heard the words, “you always get a second chance” continue to give life to people who have already had twenty or more chances and yet persevere when many others would have given up.

I also heard confused people utter various slogans hoping but no longer trusting they have any real worth or meaning. I have heard people excuse the most foolish mistakes by muttering the phrase “you only live once” but it appears the words are not life giving at all.  Instead, the catchphrase deflects responsibility and prevents them from learning from their mistake.

At their best, such proverbs are called to mind in a split second to provide sustenance and direction. The very same words can also be empty, rote and meaningless. They can create confusion and distraction instead of real integration, spiritual challenge and growth.

Yet other common phrases have become innocuous over time compared to their heavily freighted origins. An example is the saying “nothing is certain but death and taxes” which has nowhere near the impact of its first recorded use.

Those familiar with Quakerism would know that doctrine does not have the role that it has in other expressions of faith.  My title, A Quaker Reflects . . . acknowledges this.  I cannot speak for Quakers.  Nobody can. However, I trust that being a Quaker is one of many things that helps bring consistency to the way I approach understanding conventional wisdom, in the form of common adages.  I also assume that my background in congregational and institutional ministry impacts my thoughts and decisions.  As do my many roles from father to son to brother to husband to baseball fanatic.  To be clear, when I use a phrase like “Quakers say . . .” or “Quakers ask . . .” I am not speaking for all but instead holding up a common thought within Quaker circles.[i]

My intent is not to give a pass or a fail to each of the 201 turns of phrase.  Instead, my intention is to delight, invite and provoke.  My desire is to bring the words alive and into the midst of your daily struggles. The method I use is to create a discussion between Quaker values, conventional wisdom and biblical excerpts. Where you go with that is much more important than where I begin.

While each post will look the same, a common quote and a reflection followed by a bible verse and a reflection, each entry has its own genesis.  Sometimes I started with a broad concept from Quaker life and from there sprung a bible verse, which was linked to a phrase that came to mind.  Other times I thought first of a theme and searched out a quotation that then sent me running to the Bible.  Other times, my work began with a familiar verse of scripture. While I researched both historical and contemporary uses of each phrase, a lot of work never made it close to the final copy. I try to provide some context for the phrase and from there move into the juxtaposition with the chosen Bible verse. I hope the reading finds the sweet spot where elements of order and spontaneity coexist producing a healthy dialogue with each element having its own force.  The categories I provide are neither mutually exclusive nor exhaustive.[ii] My hope is that the sections help readers make connections between the quotations, the biblical verses and the Quaker advices and queries and recognize the value of doing so.

I do not offer these as systematic theology.  However, I am optimistic that the consistency of my viewpoint will be a gift.  My hope is that these reflections will speak God’s Word with life, resiliency and maturity. I offer texts, ideas and convictions that have helped me not only cope but to thrive while encountering fallen humanity and fractured social systems which, in turn, create pain, injustice, alienation and despair on a daily basis.

I describe the life of faith as “touching pain with love.”  I offer my comments, insights and illustrations hoping they bring that joy closer to the centre of your life.


[i] You will note that all of the Quotations come from “Queries and Advices” that are provided by Yearly Meetings to Friends for reflection, stimulation and edification. From the Website of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting: “Queries are an approach that Friends use to guide self-examination, using them not as an outward set of rules but as a framework within which we assess our convictions and examine, clarify, and consider prayerfully the direction of our lives and the life of our spiritual community. Rooted in the history of Friends, the Queries reflect the Quaker way of life, reminding Friends of the ideals we seek to attain. While the text of the Queries has changed somewhat over the years, it has been marked by consistency of convictions and concerns within Friends testimonies – simplicity, peace, integrity, stewardship, equality and community – as well as by strength derived from worship, ministry and social conscience.” They are offered here as a approximation of “common Quaker thoughts.” Note that I have freely intermingled from both conservative and liberal traditions. Not all Friends would recognize this as a seamless composition.

[ii] This blog is not an atlas of sayings but rather a demonstration of a method of understanding. My description of the Quaker approach to any topic is taken directly from Quaker sources and detailed with footnotes. The individual reflections give enough reference that the original sources, where applicable and available, can be traced with little effort. 

Glenn Morison's Blog

It takes two to tango

Posted on 4th mo. 22, 2017 at 12:00pm 0 Comments

While there would be universal acceptance of the notion that some things require a partnership of sorts, marriage and boxing for example, these words appear in the 1952 song by the same name, which has since covered by many. The song, first made famous by Pearl Bailey, pretends to exhaust the many things one can…

Continue

One good turn deserves another

Posted on 4th mo. 19, 2017 at 9:14am 2 Comments

This is a restating of the Latin phrase, quid pro quo, which means, “two things exchanged for equal value” and is often used in criminal court when explaining a plea bargain where both sides truly give something up and both sides truly gain something. This phrase describes what is rather than what ought to be. In…

Continue

Paddle your own canoe

Posted on 4th mo. 18, 2017 at 9:30am 17 Comments

These words come from a popular 19th Century Celtic song. The song cautions against trust and risk ending with the couplet: “And I have no wife to bother me life, no lover to prove untrue, the whole day long I laugh with the song and paddle me own canoe.” Such wisdom is contradicted by phrases like, “there is strength in numbers.” Winnipeg has a relatively small population of people with African descent. And while a few African gangs were kept apart from each other, the correctional…

Continue

Look for the similarities rather than differences

Posted on 4th mo. 15, 2017 at 10:11am 0 Comments

In a BBC interview, when speaking of her move to San Francisco, author Isabel Allende said “I have traveled all over the world and one thing that amazes me is that I can communicate with people. My story may be different but emotionally we are all the same. I tend to see the similarities in people and not the…

Continue

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Latest Activity

James C Schultz replied to Scott Martin's discussion 'What is Quaker Worship: Spirit Possession, Meditation, Cognition or Imagination?' in the group Liberal Quakers
"Personally I approach it as expectant listening.  Similar to spring Turkey hunting. :)"
11 hours ago
James C Schultz commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"I think I agree with Forest (never quite sure of that) though I also agree my use of the word true…"
11 hours ago
Forrest Curo replied to Howard Brod's discussion 'Jesus in the Gospel of Thomas' in the group Liberal Quakers
"Infants most certainly do 'grasp'. Whether they "grasp together" anything I…"
14 hours ago
Cris Fugate replied to Scott Martin's discussion 'What is Quaker Worship: Spirit Possession, Meditation, Cognition or Imagination?' in the group Liberal Quakers
"Meditation is not about stopping your thoughts, just objective thoughts. That way you can directly…"
14 hours ago
Cris Fugate replied to Howard Brod's discussion 'Jesus in the Gospel of Thomas' in the group Liberal Quakers
"Infants do not comprehend things, they say "that that". This is similar to…"
15 hours ago
Cris Fugate replied to David McKay's discussion 'Instructions for right spelling'
"I didn't read it, but it can be found on Amazon. The full title is "Instructions for…"
15 hours ago
Forrest Curo commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"I don't get the meaning of "a God." If we talk about "God as-is", then we…"
yesterday
David McKay commented on Glenn Morison's blog post 'Paddle your own canoe'
"Fair enough. But your word "true" is a little absolute for me in this instance. The…"
yesterday

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