I have been praying for all those affected by the tragedy in Boston. But in the midst of it, I realized that I am not praying for justice, but am instead praying for redemption. It's so easy to jump on board the hate train and wish the worst on our enemies, but the fact of the matter is that the perpetrators of the recent attack in Boston are just as worthy of mercy as we are. Jesus made no distinction when He gave his life for the entire world. The price of justice has already been paid. I am praying that God will bring redemption to the victims, the perpetrators and the entire situation. Our God brings beauty from ashes and joy from mourning. God hates events like this as much as we do, but I praise Jesus that He is a God of redemption... And no person or event is beyond redemption.

I just thought I'd share.

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I am in agreement, Ryan.  You couldn't have said it better.

I was greatly moved by this issue again this morning while reading headlines and internet postings regarding the refusal of ANY cemetary to accept and bury the brother who was killed by police during thier efforts to apprehend.   The rationale given by Massachussetts "authorities" seemed to revolve around bureaucrtic self preservation with statements implying that since the state does not run its own cemetary system, it is not obligated to get involved, or that the federal government cemetary program is only authorized to handle government officials and military verterns.   No religious or private cemetary has stepped forward.

That funeral and burial services for this young man be denied or cancelled due to open public hostility over his crime of committing terrorists acts ignores our religous and social history of providing for the dignified burial of others who have also previously committed gross and imhumane acts of violence, such as mass muderers, Presidential assassins, child rapists, gang lords, organized crime figures, and others    

I certainly understand concerns that there could possibly be some individuals who would memorialize his crimes in a negative fashion, which would agitate more severly the open wounds and memories of those killed and maimed by his acts.   The terrorists acts of the brothers were not sponsored by any terrorist group, nor did they have any apparentpolitical or religious following.  

The only group who seemed to grasp a sense of religious and civic duty in all of this was the mortuary society of Massachussetts and the mortician who understood the obligation to provide for the preservation of the body pending funerary arrangements, and who prepard and are holding the body for services- or disposal.

I pray for a dignified way to reslove this in a way that elevates our humanity beyond responding in hate and fear that a burial in some way condones his actions.   

 

    

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