Notice how many people talk, and talk. They go to church, they speak, they fellowship, they even have songs, hymns, and prayers—all aloud. Afterwards, they have met with the Lord God, they will say.

In James I have found the words "slow to speak," to encourage me along with Habakkuk 2:20 ". . . let the whole earth keep silence before me," when thinking of Silence in Worship. This has been of great motivation to me to practicing Silent Worship at home.

How can people, anyone, hear from Heaven and from the Lord of Light and Truth, if they are always speaking? If I am constantly speaking to someone, the other person is going to be constantly listening. That is the way I see Silence in Meditations, Devotions, or Worship. If I am praying aloud, reading always aloud, or always speaking aloud; I will not be able to hear what the Lord Jesus Christ (HERR Jesu Christie) has to say to me, to my family, to my soul, to my mind. I will have distracted my own self from deep Communion with God.

In putting this into practice the last while, all talking during our Home Meetings (when we don't go to the Mennonite services) and our daily Family Worship—the Lord is able to speak, and we are better able to hear His Leading Voice. I admit to ye all, I have a long way to go. I am not perfect. I am an unworthy creature looking to an all Worthy Saviour. I write, not as though I have apprehended these things entirely, but this one thing I have ascertained unto: forgetting those things behind me and reaching forth to those things before me.

I can say this as well, where there is an abundance of talking there is no want to iniquity. Arguments. Debates. Strife. Wrath and anger, and a multitude of other things. There is a time to speak and a time to refrain from speaking. I am learning to not be all talk. I am learning to control my mouth, by the aid of the Lord God our Heavenly Father. I am learning when to speak and what to say.

Speaking. Talking. Commotion. Clamour. Loud tones. Shouting. Whooping and hollering. . . I am growing tired of talking too much in Home or Family Worship.  So, I have been convinced of this: to practice Silence and have Heart, Hands, Mouth, and Soul laid to the Lord—whom speaks in the still small voice of calm. . . And there is Healing and Solace in that Active Silence. (Maybe I have over written? Maybe I have put this in the wrong place? Maybe I'm not qualified to speak? But aside from that, these are some of my own musings.)

Blessings to ye all, Friends.

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Very well expressed, Friend.

I, too, have that challenge to face; to learn not to speak to fill the void or because I am nervous. To listen to our Father first, then speak.

Yes, I think of the silence that followed the hurricane, the wind, the whatever else.  Was that Moses who experienced this?   He looked for God in the terrible wind, and in each dramatic element that came along, but as you say... it was in the calm.... that is what put him down on his knees before God's presence. 

Thank you for sharing, and fleshing it out so very well.  Sometimes using words a while (as you do here) does help others to feel the silence because you are in fact creating a space that is not filled by anything else:  for a period of time in our awareness, only this meditation from you and God comes through.  Thank you for creating this space that you fill by only praising God in the Silence.

In 1 Kings 19 it was Elijah that experienced this. It was not the wind, earthquake, or fire but rather the still small voice when he heard the Lord God speaking to Him. . .

This was the included in the poet's work too: "Breath thro' the heats of our desire Thy coolness and Thy balm; Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire; Speak thro' the earthquake, wind, and fire, O still, small voice of calm." John Greenleaf Whittier~1809—1892: the "Quaker Poet."

In attending all the many fellowships, churches, congregations, and myriad of denominations—even the four "tribes of Anabaptists: Amish, Brethren Old German Baptist, Old Order River Brethren, Hutterite, and Mennonite," I have noticed all are programmed. There is precious little time, if any, for quietness, for fading out of my own Selfishness, into that active realm of Silence, Awe, and Wonder of the Great Almighty HERR Gott himmel Vater. (LORD God heavenly Father.)

Yet, this is still somewhat fresh to me. I do not credit myself as having the gift of all understanding, but know this is what the Meek and Humble Christ has laid upon my heart. So, I feebly attempt to obey. Even in something so new to me. I merely wish the Lord of Light and God even His Son to stand by me.

Thank thee for thy input and thoughts.

Thy Friend,

Timothy



Olivia said:

Yes, I think of the silence that followed the hurricane, the wind, the whatever else.  Was that Moses who experienced this?   He looked for God in the terrible wind, and in each dramatic element that came along, but as you say... it was in the calm.... that is what put him down on his knees before God's presence. 

Thank you for sharing, and fleshing it out so very well.  Sometimes using words a while (as you do here) does help others to feel the silence because you are in fact creating a space that is not filled by anything else:  for a period of time in our awareness, only this meditation from you and God comes through.  Thank you for creating this space that you fill by only praising God in the Silence.

My life has been God's message to me.

Sometimes this happens through being silent. Sometimes through waking up mornings to find a new perspective in my mind.

Sometimes through listening to others; sometimes through things I find myself saying or writing.

We have to leave a little space, for whatever we haven't realized yet to come through. It doesn't have to be a long space.

Sufi Sam Lewis is said to have led his students in different forms of meditation, but always briefly: "If you don't get it right away, you should try something else."

The cult of silence is like a lug wrench sitting on the altar...

God's message happens to occur about wherever we are: in the fields, walking on wooded paths, or in the busyness of our comings and goings. Sometimes life is just a lot of racket, noise, and needless speaking. . .

This is what I am conveying or wish to convey: avoiding needless, abundant, and vain speaking. Talking idly by. No thought given, just talking. This is what I have witnessed. There is opportunity to speak, but not incessantly, undulating, and nonstop.

The wrench will not be any good, if it is laying idly upon the altar. If, in well meaning, a person deliberately goeth to the extreme; jah, the outcome is—vanity and meaningless. About as much so as the wrench or tool, which is needed, but left to rust and ruin.

As for unending speaking. . . It is like a nagging, a gnawing, an annoying drip drop on a rainy day. Common Ravens and American Crows undulate, and especially crows, it becomes obnoxious, jah—nein? (yes, no?)

There is a balance in this as well as other things. . .

Thy Friend,

Timothy



Forrest Curo said:

My life has been God's message to me.

Sometimes this happens through being silent. Sometimes through waking up mornings to find a new perspective in my mind.

Sometimes through listening to others; sometimes through things I find myself saying or writing.

We have to leave a little space, for whatever we haven't realized yet to come through. It doesn't have to be a long space.

Sufi Sam Lewis is said to have led his students in different forms of meditation, but always briefly: "If you don't get it right away, you should try something else."

The cult of silence is like a lug wrench sitting on the altar...

Timothy - Hello again! I just figured out who you are. Sorry for my denseness. Welcome to Quakerquaker. I see you are being led to the Silence as I am as well. One of the many things I was shown is that we talk way too much and unnecessarily. I notice for myself that gradually, as I listen to the nudge to NOT respond, to NOT fill the void with words, that I am more at peace INSIDE as well as outside. It is interesting, though it should not be surprising, that we are connected inside and out. So suppressing the urge to talk, which is an outward behavior, leads to further stillness on the inside. And now, after a period of being diligent about this, I am feeling less and less the urge to talk! Now I can comfortably be with someone in silence and not feel compelled to chatter. What a blessing.
It is so ironic that we all complain about lives that are too busy, too chaotic, etc. and then we fill every possible moment, where we could actually have peace, with further noise from singing, humming, the radio, meaningless chatting etc. I posted the following quotes about the sink to remind me to evaluate what I say:
"...what you speak should be good and edifying and relate to a need. Also, it should impart grace to those who hear it." Ephesians 4:29
and
"Words without shame, without content and without earnestness are not fitting for you, rather practise all the more the word of thanksgiving." Ephesians 5:4

May we all learn to value all the silences in our lives more fully as a way to draw closer to God and to hear his voice.
Barb

Hello, Barb!

Thou hast figured out who I am. . . Thank the Lord ye remember me. (Once ye have seen a picture of me, ye are not apt to forget! That is for sure and certain.)

Thou hast it worded just as this was upon mine own heart: Undulating, incessant, uncontrolled, and unprofitable talking. . . Thou hast worded it well. Too much speaking before thinking, before contemplating, or meditating and worst—coming between or interrupting our time of Worship with the Lord God and Father.

My mouth can be an engine. It can kindle a great fire. It can hold power to tear down or power to encourage or build up. "A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver," from Proverbs; and "Death and Life are in the power of the tongue, and they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof."

There is a dead silence that is void of all good. There is also a productive and meaningful silence to the good of those that wisely use it. A balance of speaking and refraining from it—especially in times of family Worship and Devotions.

Thank thee for thy input. Thy Friend,

Timothy

Barbara Smith said:

Timothy - Hello again! I just figured out who you are. Sorry for my denseness. Welcome to Quakerquaker. I see you are being led to the Silence as I am as well. One of the many things I was shown is that we talk way too much and unnecessarily. I notice for myself that gradually, as I listen to the nudge to NOT respond, to NOT fill the void with words, that I am more at peace INSIDE as well as outside. It is interesting, though it should not be surprising, that we are connected inside and out. So suppressing the urge to talk, which is an outward behavior, leads to further stillness on the inside. And now, after a period of being diligent about this, I am feeling less and less the urge to talk! Now I can comfortably be with someone in silence and not feel compelled to chatter. What a blessing.
It is so ironic that we all complain about lives that are too busy, too chaotic, etc. and then we fill every possible moment, where we could actually have peace, with further noise from singing, humming, the radio, meaningless chatting etc. I posted the following quotes about the sink to remind me to evaluate what I say:
"...what you speak should be good and edifying and relate to a need. Also, it should impart grace to those who hear it." Ephesians 4:29
and
"Words without shame, without content and without earnestness are not fitting for you, rather practise all the more the word of thanksgiving." Ephesians 5:4

May we all learn to value all the silences in our lives more fully as a way to draw closer to God and to hear his voice.
Barb

I have written things I regret, but I have learned to be patient. I have learned, even in Silence, to not speak to hasty with my fingers! I am thankful to be still grasping at the weak knowledge I have. I still see through a glass dimly, but trust in God's Light to see clearer and clearer.

So, not only in voice am I learning to be careful, but in written words too. For here they have a potential to outlive me yet even. I ask all of ye to be mindful of my weaknesses. Pray, think not the less of me for this!

Timothy

Nice post.

I'm reminded of Albert Jay Nock's maxim " Never explain, never complain, never argue".

I've conquered conflicts with this, a peaceful protest kills them inside.

Perhaps a silent meeting could be followed by one sentence from the silent, and two ears from the noisy?

Dear Brother Timothy:

Who would or could think less of you for speaking from your heart? 

 

We are much too quick to beat ourselves up when we see a failing inside ourselves, when what we need more of is kindness toward ourselves also. 

We all say things at one time we have regretted.  We are all only human and doing the best we can in each moment.   Don't be so hard on yourself.   Maybe try to be more merciful to yourself. .

 

 

 


Timothy Bruffy said:

I have written things I regret, but I have learned to be patient. I have learned, even in Silence, to not speak to hasty with my fingers! I am thankful to be still grasping at the weak knowledge I have. I still see through a glass dimly, but trust in God's Light to see clearer and clearer.

So, not only in voice am I learning to be careful, but in written words too. For here they have a potential to outlive me yet even. I ask all of ye to be mindful of my weaknesses. Pray, think not the less of me for this!

Timothy

To ye all, dear Friends:

I thank ye for all of thy replies and input. I am still learning to have a balance of speaking and a refrain from it. I also am learning a different avenue of speaking. . . a silent speaking: thinking and then typing or writing.

If I now write it should be to bring encouragement to those that read it. I have repented. I have sought the Lord of Mercy early in the mornings or in the night hours, and He hast revealed to me this area of quiet speaking and writing.

I do so appreciate all of thy feedback. It is encouraging. It is wunderbaar lieblich (wonderful lovely). If I have been of any encouragement to anyone, give thy Thanksgiving unto God, not unto me (Psalm 115: 1).

Take care, dear Friends. May the Lord be with thee and cause His face to shine upon thee and give thee peace.

Timothy

I really appreciate thy reply, Friend John. I like the thoughts of peaceful protest killing the conflicts that arises inside. I also can relate to the last sentence. I have read and re-read that again. It makes sense! Thank thee kindly.

Thy Friend in Christ,

Timothy

John George Archer said:

Nice post.

I'm reminded of Albert Jay Nock's maxim " Never explain, never complain, never argue".

I've conquered conflicts with this, a peaceful protest kills them inside.

Perhaps a silent meeting could be followed by one sentence from the silent, and two ears from the noisy?

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